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Last updateVie, 02 Jun 2017 7am

Captured history

Captured History explores how a single moment captured on film can influence society and change the course of history. Combining art, history, and media literacy, this series looks at some of the most famous photographs and details how and why these images resonate today and what effect they had when they were published.

By February 1945 the United States had been fighting World War II for more than three years. Soldiers were worn down from battle, and civilians were drained by sacrifice. But a photograph of Marines raising an American flag on Japanese soil gave a wearied nation a renewed sense of pride and hope. This powerful image of strength and determination became the most famous image of the war. It not only captured a moment of victory against a strong foe. It also represented the effort every member of the armed forces had made and offered Americans the promise of victory and an end to conflict.

In May 1963 news photographer Charles Moore was on hand to document the Childrens Crusade, a civil rights protest. But the photographs he took that day did more than document an event; they helped change history. His photograph of a trio of African-American teenagers being slammed against a building by a blast of water from a fire hose was especially powerful. The image of this brutal treatment turned Americans into witnesses at a time when hate and prejudice were on trial. It helped rally the civil rights movement and energized the public, making civil rights a national problem needing a national solution. And it paved the way for Congress to finally pass laws to give citizens equal rights regardless of the color of their skin.

For more information about famous photographs visit this blog!

http://www.worldsfamousphotos.com/

 

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